Saguinous oedipusCotton-top Tamarin

Family

  • Callitrichidae

How long do they live?

  • Wild: 10 to 15 years
  • Captivity: Up to early 20s

How big are they?

  • Length: Head and body 8 to 11 inches, tail is 12 to 17 inches (20 to 38 inches total)
  • Weight: 14 to 15 ounces in the wild, 20 to 25 ounces in captivity

Where in the world are they?

  • Costa Rica, Panama, and northwestern Colombia
  • Currently only found in Colombia

What kind of habitat do they prefer?

  • Tropical rain-forests

What do they have for lunch?

  • Wild: Insects, fruits, plant saps and gums, nectar, spiders, and small vertebrates.
  • Zoo: Zupreem Marmoset diet (a canned food for zoos), skinned fruit, vegetables, yogurt, crickets and waxworms.

Where do babies come from?

  • Females usually give birth to two babies between January and June.
  • The average birth weight of infants in captivity is between 1.4 to 1.76 ounces.
  • Born with their eyes open, they are covered in fur and have a short mane.
  • The father and older siblings assist with the birth and also carry the babies, delivering them to the mother at feeding times.
  • There is a dominant mated pair in family groups, and only that pair will breed.
  • The dominant female will urine wash branches and surrounding materials with pheromones that will inhibit cycling in other females, so only she will birth young.

Special AdaptationsCotton-top Tamarin

  • Claws help the tamarins grip branches, since their fingers are small and non-opposable.
  • Their long limbs and tail help make them excellent jumpers.
  • Females have highly developed scent glands.
  • Their tails help with balance, but are not prehensile

Tamarin Facts

  • Tamarins usually live in small territorial groups of 3 to 9, and defend their chosen area.
  • The group consists usually of a mated pair and their young offspring.
  • Cotton-tops are active from dawn until dusk (diurnal) usually grooming, sunbathing, or stretching out on a perch, with rest at midday.
  • They have a highly developed vocal repertoire with at least 38 distinct vocalizations.
  • They make a variety of noises including whistles, screeches, squeaks, and warbles.
  • They have specific vocals for alarm, food, levels of aggression, and submission.
  • Some of their calls are too high-pitched for even humans to hear.

Conservation Status

  • IUCN -Critically Endangered
  • CITES -Appendix I
  • Native people used to kill the Cotton-top tamarin for its tender flesh.
  • During the late 1960s and early 1970s, between 20,000 and 40,000 cotton-top tamarins were imported into the U.S. for biomedical research.
  • Tamarins are found to develop colonic adenocarcinoma (colon cancer) and were used for in-depth studies of colon cancer.
  • The species is now listed as critically endangered and exportation has been banned.

Sources

  1. Animal Diversity Web. Accessed January 2016. http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Saguinus_oedipus/
  2. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016.http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  3. ARKive. Accessed January 2016. http://www.arkive.org/cotton-headed-tamarin/saguinus-oedipus/
  4. Encyclopedia of Life. Accessed January 2016. http://www.eol.org/pages/323908/overview
  5. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016.http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search

Cotton-top Tamarin