Cacatua albacockatoou fb1

Family

  • Psittacidae

Lifespan

  • 27 years
  • 40 years based on anecdotal evidence

Size

  • Length: 18 inches
  • Weight: 16-24 ounces
  • Wingspan: 9-12 inches

Range

  • North Moluccas of the Maluka province of Indonesia
  • Naturally occur on the islands of Halmahera, Bacan, Ternate, Kasirua, Tidore and Mandioli
  • Introduced to the islands of Obi and Bisa: as escaped or released captives

Habitat

  • Wooded areas, forests, mangroves, swamps, agricultural areas and around rivers
  • Requires large trees for nesting and communal roosting

Diet

  • Wild: Mainly fruit (papaya, durian, langsat, rambutan), berries, and seeds. Occasionally will eat crickets or skinks
  • Zoo: Mazuri Parrot chow, and fresh produce

Reproduction

  • Lay an average of 2 eggs a season
  • Both male and female incubate their eggs over about 30 days
  • Chicks fly after 3 months but parents continue to care for them for another 2-3 weeks afterward
  • Parents usually only raise 1 chick, even if another is hatched

Interesting Facts

  • White cockatoos are extremely smart; they have been known to use a branch to scratch their backs.

Conservation Status

  • CITES -Appendix II
  • IUCN –Endangered

Sources

  1. AnAge: The Animal Aging and Longevity Database. Accessed January 2016. http://genomics.senescence.info/species/entry.php?species=Cacatua_alba
  2. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  3. BirdLife International (2016) Species factsheet: Cacatua alba. Accessed January 21, 2016 http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22684789
  4. Encyclopedia of Life. Accessed January 2016 http://www.eol.org/pages/1178086/overview
  5. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search

Eclectus roratuseclectus fb2

Family

  • Psittacidae

Lifespan

  • ~28 years
  • 40.8 years based on anecdotal evidence

Size

  • Length: 14 inches
  • Weight: 16 ounces

Range

  • Soloman Islands, Sumba, New Guinea, Maluku Islands, Northeastern Australia

Habitat

  • Emergent rainforest trees near a freshwater source

Diet

  • Wild: Fruits, wild figs, unripe nuts, leaf and flower buds, and some seeds
  • Zoo: Mazuri Parrot chow, produce, and corn

Reproduction

  • Pairs nest within hollows in emergent rainforest trees
  • Eclectus parrots become sexually mature at 2-3 years
  • Two eggs are typically laid in the spring
  • Incubation takes 28-30 days
  • Young fledge around 11 weeks

Interesting Facts

  • Typically the male has the more showy plumage in birds and the female is camouflaged, but in this species the females have vivid coloration, while the males' green hue blends with the foliage as they forage in the trees for food

Conservation Status

  • CITES –Appendix II
  • IUCN –Least Concern

Sources

  1. AnAge: The Animal Aging and Longevity Database. Accessed January 2016. http://genomics.senescence.info/species/entry.php?species=Eclectus_roratus
  2. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  3. BirdLife International (2016) Species factsheet: Eclectus roratus. Accessed January 2016 http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=1446
  4. Encyclopedia of Life. Accessed January 2016 http://eol.org/pages/914968/details
  5. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search

 

Our Newest Addition is OTTER-ly adorable!

We are exploding with excitement to announce the newest addition to the Children’s Zoo: TNT, the North American river otter! We have been introducing him to Bootie, the river otter that currently lives here. On the morning of June 8th, the two went on exhibit together for the first time! Visit us on Facebook to see their adorable video.


North American river otters are highly territorial mammals. Until just a few months ago, the Children’s Zoo was home to two female river otters, Bootie and Mika. Unfortunately, the two never became friends. Mika passed away this last winter as the oldest living North American river otter in a facility accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA).


Unable to survive in the wild, Bootie found a home at the Children’s Zoo, where she is an ambassador for her species. Having been born in the wild, Bootie is a great candidate for breeding in the North American river otter Species Survival Plan (SSP), a global AZA sponsored program that works toward saving animals from extinction. With the new available space, and a recommendation from AZA to breed, it was decided that a young male should join her. The Brookgreen Gardens, located in South Carolina, offered to loan TNT to us, hoping the two would produce healthy babies called pups. A natural aquatic acrobat, make plans to see TNT’s silly water antics this summer!

Click here to watch a video of Bootie and TNT going on exhibit for the first time together!

 

Children’s Zoo sad to announce the passing of four iconic animal residents

 

It is with a heavy heart that the Children’s Zoo announces the passing of four iconic, geriatric animal residents: Andy the Jersey cow, Josie and Bonnie the Clydesdale horses, and Zena the grey wolf. While under close observations from zoo staff due to elevated ages, it became apparent that they were all suffering—each in their own way. Much like a family must do with their beloved pet, the decision had to be made based on the quality of life for our four furry friends. On Wednesday, October 28th, our historic residents were humanely euthanized while surrounded by their zookeepers. 

 cow jersey

Due to the zoo's dedication to provide the best possible care, many animals live long lives, far surpassing maximum ages reached in the wild. Caring for geriatric animals requires extra special attention from our zookeepers, and with so many living here at the zoo, it has become a large portion of their job. They must administer medicine and supplements, weigh their animals often, be aware of any changes in eating habits, and be observant of even the slightest changes in behavior.  

 

Andy was born on a dairy farm among hundreds of cattle. He arrived at the Children’s Zoo in 2007 at the age of 8, and has been showing off his pearly whites since. He would often be seen grooming his hoofed friends, sticking his tongue in his nose, or flashing his iconic smile at visitors. Extreme age, combined with worsening of a pre-existing physical condition which hindered his mobility, compromised his quality of life.

 

After years of pulling carriages, Bonnie and Josie arrived at the Children’s Zoo in 2007 to spend their “retirement years.” These gentle giants have delighted zoo-goers for years, always eager for a good nose-scratching from visitors large and small.  Bonnie suffered from chronic joint deterioration, combined more recently with an infection that did not respond to multiple treatment attempts. Josie exhibited sudden, extreme weight loss which did not improve from increased food consumption.  As each of these symptoms began to worsen, the two were exhibiting significant signs of pain and discomfort.

 grey wolf zena

Zena, everybody’s favorite white wolf, came to the zoo as a spry 2-year old in 2000.  She has helped educate countless zoo visitors over the course of her life, inspiring awe in the natural world.  Her adorable antics of interacting with enrichment, spying on guests from behind the trees, and wading in her pond has endeared her to visitors during the last 15 years.  Having outlived 3 companion wolves while at the zoo, Zena began to display symptoms of chronic joint deterioration earlier this year. As time passed, her symptoms progressed dramatically to the point where she was having difficulty moving about her exhibit. Zookeepers also noticed severe behavioral changes, all of which indicated failing health and a compromised quality of life.   

 

In this difficult moment, we invite you to grieve with us. If Andy, Bonnie, Josie, or Zena had a special place in your heart, please join us for a memorial service during our Holidays in the Heart of the City event on November 20th, 5:30 – 8:30pm. There is free admission into the event. If you would like to share a memory or a picture(s) to be used during the memorial, please send them to info@saginawzoo.com, or share them on our facebook page at www.facebook.com/childrenszoo

 

The zoo would like to thank the community for its ongoing support. We expect a busy winter as we move forward, bringing in new animals and acclimating them to your zoo. Even though we just closed for the season, we are already looking forward to seeing you in the spring of 2016! 

horse clydes 1

 

You have GOAT to meet our newest friends!

Bouncing, leaping, and prancing—these are just a few of the silly antics our newest residents like to pull. Flash and Fraser, two adorable baby pygmy goats, will soon be seen hoofing it around the goat yard. The two will join Bandit and Buttons, the alpine goats, in mid-June. Check out our Facebook page daily for the most current, up-to-date news at the Zoo, including the goats official debut date!

Pygmy goats originally hail from West Africa. Their friendly, curious, and playful nature, as well as their hardiness and ability to adapt to most climates, has allowed the pygmy goats to spread all over the world. Enjoyed as both pets and dairy producers, pygmy goats can be found on many farms across the United States.

The goat yard is now officially open for visitors to enter and join our hoofed friends. Kids (and kids at heart!) can now pet and groom the goats, allowing for tactile learning and development.

Fraser, mostly white with caramel flecks and black feet, is the big softy between the two. He will probably be found leaning against your legs, or nibbling gently at your shoelaces. Flash, on the other hand, is ready to show off his fearless leaping abilities! Mostly black with two white racing stripes up his sides, he is often seen bouncing off of various logs and rocks as he fights invisible bad guys. 

Flash Fraser