Odocoileus virginianusdeer

Family

  • Cervidae

Lifespan

  • Most white-tail deer live 2-3 years in the wild
  • Maximum lifespan in the wild is 20 years, but very few live past 10 years
  • Average lifespan in captivity 16 years, but as long as 23 has been recorded

Size

  • Height: 31.5-39.4 inches at the shoulder
  • Length: 5.25-7.25 feet
  • Weight: 125.5-301.8 pounds

Range

  • Most of southern Canada, all of the continental United States except a few states in the west, throughout Central America to Bolivia

Habitat

  • Very wide range of potential habitats
  • Big woods, deep saw grass, hammock swamps, farmlands, brushy areas, cactus and thornbrush deserts
  • Ideal habitat would contain dense thickets to hide in, and edges, to provide food

Diet

  • Herbivore
  • In eastern forests: buds and twigs of maple, sassafras, poplar, aspen, and birch as well as many types of shrubs
  • In deserts: huajillo brush, yucca, prickly pear cactus, comal, ratama, and various tough shrubs
  • Conifers are utilized in the winter when food is scarce

Reproduction

  • Polygynous
  • Mating occurs from October to December
  • Gestation approximately 6 and a half months
  • Fawns are able to walk at birth and nibble on vegetation within days
  • The first time a doe has a litter, typically only one offspring is born, but in subsequent years 2 through as many as 4 fawns can be born at a time

Special adaptations

  • Characteristic white tail, very easy to see them as they run away with their tail up
  • Able to run at speeds up to 30 mph through tangled terrain in a forest

Interesting facts

  • White-tailed deer are the shyest most skittish of the deer
  • They are remarkable swimmers, often going into large bodies of water to escape terrestrial predators and bothersome insects, or to reach remote islands with potentially untapped food resources

Conservation status

  • CITES –Not evaluated
  • IUCN –Least concern

Sources

  1. Animal Diversity Web. Accessed February 2016. http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Odocoileus_virginianus/
  2. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  3. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search

Gallus gallus domesticusOrpington1

Family

  • Phasianidae

Common Name

  • Orpington Chicken

Lifespan

  • Average 8 years

Size

  • Weight: Males – 10 pounds Females - 8 pounds

Range

  • A domestic, hearty chicken that is found living alongside humans

Diet

  • Omnivores
  • In the wild: Insects and seeds
  • At the zoo: Game bird chow

ReproductionOrpington2

  • The eggs produced are light to dark brown
  • On average lay up to 200 eggs a year

Interesting facts

  • Bred in Orpington, England by William Cook in 1886
  • Spread to America in 1903
  • Favored for its growth rate, egg laying rate, and table-top characteristics

Conservation status

  • CITES –Not Listed
  • IUCN –Not Evaluated

Sources

  1. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  2. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search
  3. Livestock Conservancy.org Orpington Chicken Breed Facts. Accessed February, 2016. http://www.livestockconservancy.org/index.php/heritage/internal/orpington

Trachemys scripta elegansturtleres port1

Family

  • Emydidae

Lifespan

  • Up to 30 years

Size

  • Male shell length: ~11.5 inches
  • Female shell length: ~9.5 inches

Range

  • Native to Southeastern United States, but as a result of their popularity in the pet trade, their eventual escape of release from captivity improperly has resulted in this turtle being found on all continents except Antarctica.

Habitat

  • Shallow, slow-moving freshwater with abundant plant life.

Diet

  • Omnivorous. Though young tend to be more carnivorous and adults tend to be more herbivorous.

Reproductionturtleres fb2

  • Oviparous, egg laying.
  • Females dig a jug-shaped nest in damp soil. Traveling over up to half a mile to find a suitable nesting site
  • Females lay 5-20 eggs per clutch
  • Up to three clutches per year
  • Eggs hatch after incubating for 60-91 days

Interesting facts

  • Considered one of the top 100 invasive species of the world

Conservation status

  • CITES –Not Listed
  • IUCN –Least concern

Sources

  1. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  2. Encyclopedia of Life. Accessed January 2016. http://www.eol.org/pages/1242026/overview
  3. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search

Kinosternon scorpioides albogulareturtlemud port1

Family

  • Kinosternidae

Lifespan

  • There is limited information for the longevity of this species
  • Our white-throated mud slider, Ox, is about 10 years old as of 2016

Size

  • Male average carapace length: 5.3-5.9 inches
  • Female average carapace length: 5-5.5 inches

Range

  • Colombia, the Colombian island of San Andrés, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama

Habitat

  • Small of large freshwater ponds with vegetation and macrophytes, slow running streams, swamps, floodable mangrove forests that are not permanently connected to the sea.

Diet

  • Omnivorous
  • Occasionally a scavenger
  • In the wild: fruits, terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates (molluscs and arthropods), and dipteran larvae, which is common prey

Reproductionturtlemud fb1

  • Courtship and mating happen twice a year, in roughly January and July depending on region.
  • Understanding of their reproduction is limited
  • Usually laying 2-5 eggs per clutch, but 1-6 possible
  • Eggs incubation for 111-194 days
  • Eggs are around 1.2 x 0.6 inches

Special adaptations

  • Like all turtles they have a hard outer shell that helps them avoid being eaten
  • Plastron has two kinetic hinges generally with lobes, able to completely close ventral openings of the shell

Interesting facts

  • This species is host to at least 4 different species of nematode parasites in the wild

Conservation status

  • CITES –Not Listed
  • IUCN –Not Evaluated
  • Extant populations have limited contact with humans, some of their population is within already protected areas, and they have a high population density; therefore are not considered threatened.

Sources

  1. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  2. Kinosternon scorpioides albogulare White-Throated Mud Turtle, Swanka Turtle [Forero-Medina, German. Castaño-Mora, Olga V., et al]. December 31, 2011. Conservation Biology of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises. Chelonian Research Monographs, no. 5. Accessed February, 2016. http://www.iucn-tftsg.org/wp-content/uploads/file/Accounts/crm_5_064_albogulare_v1_2011.pdf
  3. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search

 

 Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima manni

turtlecaw port1

Family

  • Geoemydidae

Lifespan

  • In the wild: 30+ years
  • In captivity: On average 1 year. Seldom does well in captivity. Record age 20.4 years

Size

  • Male Length: ~7 inches
  • Females Length: ~8 inches

Range

  • Central America: Southern Nicaragua to Northwest Costa Rica

Habitat

  • Damp woodlands, terrestrial lowlands, clearings near water sources

Diet

  • In the wild: Wild flowers, fruit, grasses, fish, worms, and insects
  • At the zoo: Greens, crickets, mealworms, fresh water turtle diet, mixed produce

Reproduction

  • Oviparous, egg laying
  • Male head bobbling is common in courtship, also follows females and "noses her tail and shell
  • Eggs are laid between May and December, usually in soil or leaf litter
  • Clutch size 3-5 eggs with an average of 4 clutches per year
  • Temperature sex determination, 24-27 degrees celsius produces males, 27-30 degrees celsius can produce both males and females, and temperatures above 30 degrees celsius produce females

Interesting facts

  • These turtles do not do well in captivity. Their health rapidly deteriorates. An exact cause is yet to be determined.
  • One of four subspecies of the painted wood turtles
  • One of the most colorful of the painted wood turtles
  • Serves as a biological control of agricultural pests, especially insects

Conservation status

  • CITES –Not Listed
  • IUCN –Not Listed

Sources

  1. Animal Diversity Web. Accessed February 2016. http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Rhinoclemmys_pulcherrima/
  2. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  3. Encyclopedia of Life.org Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima. Accessed February, 2016. http://www.eol.org/pages/790816/overview
  4. Encyclopedia of Life.org Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima manni. Accessed February, 2016. http://www.eol.org/pages/1275188/overview
  5. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/searchturtlecaw fb1