Name the Turtle Coloring Contest
We need your help finding the perfect name for a sea turtle!

 

Underwater photographer Rob Quartermain, the Children's Zoo at Celebration Square, and Hartley Outdoor Education Hawksbill Sea TurtleCenter are partnering together to provide students with a unique opportunity to name a sea turtle from Bonaire, located in Dutch Caribbean!

Bonaire is an island off the north coast of South America, near the western part of Venezuela. Visit www.tourismbonaire.com to learn more! Surrounded by beautiful ocean waves, it is the perfect home for a sea turtle!

The winner will be selected in late summer or early fall. 

 

Download the Entry Form & Coloring Page (PDF)

Oryctologus cuniculusRabbits1

Family

  • Leporidae

Lifespan

  • Flemish Giant: 6-9 years
  • Lop Rex Hybrid: 8-10 years

Size

  • Flemish Giant
    • Length: 16-22 inches
    • Weight: 10-30 pounds, males being larger
  • Lop Rex Hybrid
    • Length: 15-22 inches
    • Weight: 3.3-5.5 pounds

Origin

  • The Flemish Giant breed originates from the Dutch/Flanders region in Europe
  • Our other rabbits are a hybrid of Holland Lop and Rex rabbits.
  • The last Ice Age confined the species to the Iberian Peninsula and small areas of France and northwest Africa, but due to human action and adaptability of this species, European rabbits today exist in the wild on every continent except Asia and Antarctica

Habitat

  • Grasslands and open woodlands

Diet

  • In the wild: Succulent plant matter
  • At the zoo: Purina rabbit chow, greens, produce, and hay

Reproduction

  • After a gestation of 28- 33 days, a litter of 4-8 kits are born inside the burrow or nest site.
  • One wild female rabbit may have up to 6 litters a year, but normally only 10-12 kits survive from each female every year.

Special adaptations

  • Rabbits have eyes on the sides of their head, allowing them an almost 360° view
  • Large ears help draw body heat away from the core, preventing over-heating during warm months
  • Large hind feet provide rabbits with a very powerful kick, which they can use as a defense mechanism, or to power large jumps when escaping predators
  • Rabbits, and many other lagomorphs, practice ‘coprophagy’ or the behavior of consuming fecal matter. This benefits them by adding bacteria to the digestive tract to aid in the breakdown of tough plant matter.

Interesting facts

  • Our Flemish giant rabbits are a large breed and prefer cool temperatures, often lying stretched out in snow banksRabbits2
  • Rabbits will “thump” with their back feet to communicate to other rabbits when danger is present
  • Rabbits live in large social units and dig an immense tunnel system, called a warren, if allowed
  • Lagomorphs possess a ‘peg tooth’ – a second pair of small incisors which lack a cutting edge found directly behind the large front incisors
  • Rabbits and hares are commonly thought to be rodents, but are in fact classified in a separate family

Conservation status

  • CITES –Not Listed
  • IUCN –Not Evaluated

Sources

  1. Animal Diversity Web. Accessed January 2016. http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Oryctolagus_cuniculus/
  2. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  3. Encyclopedia of Life. Accessed January 2016.http://www.eol.org/pages/327977/overview
  4. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search

 

Streptopella capicolaDove Ringnecked01

Family

  • Columbidae

How long do they live?

  • 10 or more years with good care
  • We have had doves as old as 18

How big are they?

  • Length: 9.8–10.4 inches
  • Weight: 3.2–6.6 ounces

Where in the world are they?

  • The domestic dove can be found world-wide because it is kept in captivity by humans.
  • The domestic Ring-necked Dove is descendent from the wild African Ring-necked Dove, which inhabits the savannah regions of North Africa.

What kind of habitat do they prefer?

  • Semi-desert scrub, Boscia and Acacia savannah, a variety of woodland types, farmlands, open plantations and alien acacia thickets

What do they have for lunch?

  • In the wild: Seeds of grasses, cereal grains, lupines, milkweeds, alien acacias and pines, but also on broken fruit and berries of oaks, gums, currants and Lantana, and insects like earthworms, termites, and weevils on occasion

Where do babies come from?

  • Two to four pure white eggs are laid
  • Both sexes participate in the incubation that takes around two weeks
  • Chicks are fed regurgitated food by both parents and fledge after about 16 days
  • Several broods (up to 5) may be raised in a single breeding season

Interesting Facts

  • This type of dove gets its name from the black crescent shape marking on the lower neck

Conservation Status

  • CITES –Not Listed
  • IUCN –Least Concern

Sources

  1. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  2. BirdLife International (2016) Species factsheet: Streptopella capicola. Accessed January 2016. http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22690488
  3. Encyclopedia of Life. Accessed January 2016. http://www.eol.org/pages/1049719/overview
  4. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search

 

Capra hircus Pygmies1

Family

  • Bovidae

Common Names

  • African Pygmy Goats, Cameroon Dwarf

Lifespan

  • 10-15 years

Size

  • Height at shoulder: Male 17-22 inches Female 17-21 inches

Range

  • This breed originated in the Cameroon valley of Africa, where it was first domesticated
  • Because they are domesticated, pygmy goats can be found most places there are humans

Diet

  • In the wild: Grasses, herbs, lichens, and other plant matter
  • At the zoo: Mazuri goat chow, timothy/alfalfa hay, and grain

Reproduction

  • Twins are typically born, single and triple births being the next common
  • Gestation lasts about 150 days

Special adaptations

  • Pygmy goats are much shorter in stature than other domestic goats

Interesting facts

  • They produce a formidable amount of milk for their size

Conservation status

  • CITES –Not Listed
  • IUCN –Not Evaluated

Sources

  1. Agriculture.com Specialty Livestock: African Pygmy Goats (2010). Accessed January 2016. http://www.agriculture.com/livestock/speciality-livestock/pygmy-goat-profile_293-ar13324
  2. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  3. Encyclopedia of Life. Accessed January 2016. http://www.eol.org/pages/328660/details
  4. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search

 

Cacatua albacockatoou fb1

Family

  • Psittacidae

Lifespan

  • 27 years
  • 40 years based on anecdotal evidence

Size

  • Length: 18 inches
  • Weight: 16-24 ounces
  • Wingspan: 9-12 inches

Range

  • North Moluccas of the Maluka province of Indonesia
  • Naturally occur on the islands of Halmahera, Bacan, Ternate, Kasirua, Tidore and Mandioli
  • Introduced to the islands of Obi and Bisa: as escaped or released captives

Habitat

  • Wooded areas, forests, mangroves, swamps, agricultural areas and around rivers
  • Requires large trees for nesting and communal roosting

Diet

  • Wild: Mainly fruit (papaya, durian, langsat, rambutan), berries, and seeds. Occasionally will eat crickets or skinks
  • Zoo: Mazuri Parrot chow, and fresh produce

Reproduction

  • Lay an average of 2 eggs a season
  • Both male and female incubate their eggs over about 30 days
  • Chicks fly after 3 months but parents continue to care for them for another 2-3 weeks afterward
  • Parents usually only raise 1 chick, even if another is hatched

Interesting Facts

  • White cockatoos are extremely smart; they have been known to use a branch to scratch their backs.

Conservation Status

  • IUCN –Endangered

Sources

  1. AnAge: The Animal Aging and Longevity Database. Accessed January 2016. http://genomics.senescence.info/species/entry.php?species=Cacatua_alba
  2. Appendices I, II, and III of CITES. (February 5, 2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.cites.org/eng/app/appendices.php
  3. BirdLife International (2016) Species factsheet: Cacatua alba. Accessed January 21, 2016 http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22684789
  4. Encyclopedia of Life. Accessed January 2016 http://www.eol.org/pages/1178086/overview
  5. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (2015) Accessed January 2016. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/search